Copyright is collaborative

Giving copyright advice has always been something I relish, getting stuck into a new copyright conundrum is a great way of learning about new aspects of copyright and building up my knowledge. I am also grateful to the wonderful network of copyright officers I have built up over the years, so when I get a new query I am unsure of I turn to my copyright community. However, one thing I have always been aware of is that answering so many colleagues queries on an individual basis doesn’t always foster a sense of community. So when Chris reported on his successful Copyright Community of Practice events at the University of Kent, I did what we all do when we see a good idea, I decided to copy it!

Last week we had the first event at LSE and I was delighted to have 11 colleagues attend, including library staff, communications staff (who were all mainly blog editors) and a learning technologist. The topics we had up for discussion were the purpose of the Community of Practice, the new CLA Licence and the Digital Content Store, the digitisation of an important collection of EU Referendum leaflets at LSE and the copyright implications and the recent audit of one department’s Moodle courses by one of our Learning Technologists. Other topics raised during our discussions were: how to cite images licensed under Creative Commons and what the different licences all actually mean, what to do about including screenshots in guides we might be producing in-house, for example when they contain company logos. We also discussed open access and why academic colleagues often don’t think about the copyright transfer agreements they sign, whether pre-prints in word format could be uploaded to Moodle or not and a few other topics. I was delighted by the suggestion from Chris Gilson to write some guidance on copyright for blog editors. I had a search around and most of what I found is American. We also had some suggestions of topics to discuss at the next meeting which we hope to hold at the end of September.

And we had biscuits and tea and I can confirm that LSE staff prefer Jammy Dodgers on a hot August afternoon rather than any chocolate coated biscuits!

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