ECIL in Prague: copyright literacy and digital inclusion

Jane on the Charles BridgeI’m really excited to be presenting at the European Conference on Information Literacy which this year is being held in Prague from 10th -14th October. This is the fourth conference and I’ve been lucky enough to attend every year since the conference started in 2013 in Istanbul. I went to Dubrovnik in 2014, Tallinn in 2015 and this year I am in Prague. The focus of the conference is information literacy, and many papers address issues related to digital literacy as well. It’s a European conference but in fact people come from all over the world, so it’s a fantastic place to get a global perspective on the work I do at LSE to support staff and students develop their digital literacy. The conference also has a strong link with the work I do to provide support and education in copyright matters. This year there are nearly 300 delegates from over 50 countries with just 19 from the UK. The conference theme is about information literacy in the inclusive society and we’ve had keynotes from Tara Brabazon and Jan Van Dijk.

I am presenting twice at the conference, firstly in a panel session that was held on Monday, based on outreach and advocacy work I do as Chair of the CILIP Information Literacy Group (ILG). My co-presenters were Sharon Wagg from the Tinder Foundation, who are a charity who work to promote digital inclusion, and Stephane Goldstein, who as well as being a freelance consultant, is the Advocacy and Outreach Officer for the ILG. In our panel we discussed some recent collaborations between librarians in academic sector with those in public libraries, to share their experiences of helping to develop digital literacies and promote digital inclusion. The TeachMeet events ILG and Tinder Foundation organised earlier in the year were a great way that academic and public librarians could share ideas and experience. I was delighted that two colleagues from LSE Library, Andra Fry and Sonia Gomes, attended one of these events in February to share our experiences from the Student Ambassadors for Digital Literacy (SADL) programme we were running for three years, to support LSE undergraduates. The panel discussion encouraged participants to share any digital inclusion initiatives they were involved in around the world. We also discussed what made these collaborations successful and why there might be problems and challenges working in this space. Sharon highlighted the Tinder Foundation’s work with libraries through their digital inclusion fund and it was inspiring to hear about work to support the most vulnerable in society, such as the elderly, job seekers and refugees develop basic and more advanced digital skills.

Astronomical clockECIL is also the spiritual home of copyright literacy, as this was where I first heard about the work of Tania Todorova and her colleagues to survey librarians on a country basis about their knowledge of copyright and requirements for education in this field. This was back in 2014 in Dubrovnik and last year Chris and I presented the UK survey results in Tallinn. This year I’m returning to present our latest research, exploring the experiences of UK librarians of copyright, using a research method used in education and information literacy called phenomenography. It’s still early days – we carried out 3 focus groups in higher education and have been juggling work and some pretty intensive data analysis. As neither of us had used phenomenography before we are grateful to the help and advice we received from Emma Coonan and Lauren Smith, as well as several very useful articles they pointed us to. I’m sharing our slides from the ECIL presentation which I delivered on Tuesday morning. It has also been great to catch up with Tania, Serap, Joumana and several of the people who undertook the copyright literacy survey in their own country. Part of what motivated Chris and I to do this research was to understand the fear and anxiety that copyright can create, to look at why it’s a topic many in higher education shy away from learning more about, and use this data to better inform how we develop copyright education. I was struck once again by how important it is to get an international perspective on the work we do, and to see in many cases there are so many things we can learn from others experiences and so much that unites us in our work.

Presenting at ECIL 2015The research and collaboration with Chris has informed my thinking about the best way to provide support for others with copyright queries at LSE. For example, I now use a Copyright Card Game in my workshops, which are a fun and engaging way to learn about copyright. However, being seen as ‘the copyright expert’ can be quite a lonely place, and for me it is important that everyone learns a bit about copyright. This is partly what has motivated me to set up a Copyright Community of Practice at LSE (admittedly I did borrow this idea from Chris who set one up at Kent over the summer). The next session is going to be on the 4th November and it is open to any member of staff at LSE! Meanwhile I will enjoy a few more days in beautiful Prague and return to LSE full of more ideas and possibilities to enhance the support that we provide!

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The Publishing Trap: case study and video now online

Chris and I wrote a short blog post earlier in the year about the prototype game that we pitched at LILAC 2016, called the Publishing Trap. This week the CILIP Information Literacy group have published a case study about our game on their website. The games competition, Lagadothon is running at next year’s conference so they asked us to make a video to encourage others to enter the competition and tell you more about our game. Let us know what you think as our video is below:

The game was inspired by our work on Copyright the Card Game, and we decided to create a new game aimed at academics, PhD students and researchers to help them understand the scholarly communication process and the impact of the choices they make when disseminating their research findings.  The Publishing Trap won a runner’s up prize and the IL case study describes the aim of the game, how the game works and our ideas about the game to date.

Of dreams and nightmares and vulnerability

IMG_5301Next week I’ll keynote the Association for Learning Technology’s annual conference – ALT-C. Yes I hear you say, so what, big deal, Jane you do talks all the time. Hmmm yes, right I do, but this one is big (450 people coming this year), and a lot of my friends and colleagues attend. And I’m a keynote, up there with some pretty big names – Ian Livingstone no less, but also Josie Fraser, Donna Lanclos, Dave White and Lia Commissar. It’s fair to say I have been nervous about this since I was invited by Nic Whitton in early April. Nervous, but also slightly thrilled at being given the opportunity to do a keynote and to challenge myself. It’s really easy to stay in our comfort zone and talk to audiences we know, about projects we’ve worked on, to relatively small, friendly audiences. That is not to say ALT-C is not a conference I’m unfamiliar with. I’ve attended about 4 or 5 times since I started working in the learning technology field back in 2000. I also do know lots of learning technologists – after all I work with them every day! I can speak their language. However, I’m going to talk to them about copyright and I need to try and get them fired up about it!

In reality I have only had one nightmare, which I joked about last week on twitter. In my dream the podium was too high, the audience couldn’t hear me over some revving cars and the clicker wasn’t working so my slides kept switching at the wrong time. Nothing can be as bad as our nightmares.

So the keynote is written, the slides are finished, the credits have been done and my outfit is chosen and packed. I now just need to get myself in the zone. I’m planning some Amy Cuddy style power posing, a bit of loud 1980s music to get me in the mood (Eye of the Tiger!) and not over-doing it the night before at the conference dinner. Fear of failure is what often stops people doing something new or different. Even down to the way I prepared for this talk I’ve tried a different approach. And I’m also prepared for it not going perfectly. Afterall, as Brene Brown says, we are not perfect, we are human and vulnerability is essential to making connections with others. So if you see me this week and I look a bit distracted, now you know why. Feel free to give me a hug or a thumbs up! But I will come through this, I will enjoy it and I know I’ll make some mistakes and learn a lot. Roll on keynote number 2 eh?

A writing and thinking retreat

The gardens at Wolfson College

This week I spent 3 days in Cambridge at Wolfson College, which was the college I lived at for a term in 2011 when I was an Arcadia Fellow. This was one of the most amazing few months of my life, as not only did I get to work for 3 months on thinking about how information literacy should be taught in the future, but I got to work with the fabulous Emma Coonan.

I recall being pretty terrified about being away from home  and spent most weekends fleeing back to London. But I found Wolfson a friendly, welcoming place and somewhere I immediately felt at home. I particularly enjoyed meeting all the other students and fellows from around the world. I made some fantastic friends during my time there and probably had some of the most memorable breakfast conversations ever. I will never forget the breakfast where I was joined by several international fellows who were staying at Wolfson, and we discussed the fall of the Roman Empire. There was a point I recall saying to the professor from Pakistan and the Malaysian Ambassador for the Lebanon, I think we could do with a PowerPoint with a map on it as we discussed Hadrian’s Wall and some of the Roman sites in the Middle East. I started listening to Radio 4’s Today Programme after I left Wolfson to try to recreate these high brow moments before I start my day. It’s just not the same.

This week the canteen was shut so I spent a lot of time on my own, although I did get to spend some time in the wonderful Library, chatting to the College Librarian Meg Westbury about information and digital literacy, our mutual research interests in online learning and phenomenography. I also went on a wonderful walk to The Orchard Tea Rooms in Grantchester and thought of my dear Brazilian friend, Cris, a journalist who was there for the same time as me and who I used to go walking with. I wandered in the beautiful gardens and spent a lot of time in my room writing and reading.

Rethinking Copyright by Ronan Deazley

The purpose of my trip was to try and nail my keynote for ALT-C, which is now in around 3 weeks time. I am so honoured to be invited to keynote this conference, but also slightly terrified as it’s a big conference and one that a lot of learning technologists attend. There was no pressure when I saw the other keynotes I was up against either: Dave White, Donna Lanclos, Josie Fraser, Ian Livingstone and Lia Commissar! I am going to be talking about copyright and e-learning, the subject of my new book, but I really want to make my keynote different to other talks I’ve done before. I started reading Ronan Deazely’s book, Rethinking Copyright while I was away, and have been struck by his writing on what copyright is (and isn’t) and the public domain. So if I can hint a little, then I might be saying something on the history of copyright and on the notion of the public domain. Ronan is the main editor behind the website CopyrightUser, and Chris and I recently wrote the guidance for libraries on this site.

Anyway, mostly what I appreciated while in Cambridge was some perspective on things and some time to concentrate on the subjects I am most interested in. I have spoken before about the importance of finding a place where you can think, and at Wolfson I have definitely found that place, and I was more productive in just three days there than I usually am in a week!

Finding your place

I was asked to make a video about tips for new researchers and I was taken back to thinking about a workshop Emma and I ran twice on doing research as a librarian. We talked about finding your niche and finding a place to think. When I talk about finding your place I mean both of those things. But I also think librarians struggle with their identity as a researcher (as I suspect many people do, undergraduate students for example). But librarians often spend a lot of time helping other people do research and providing ‘support’ when in reality they should be acknowledged as researchers. I am not sure why they are not, but I think changing your own attitude towards your identity might help. If we didn’t have libraries and librarians a huge amount of research would be impossible. We provide access to the literature, we hold archives of huge significance which we help people to navigate and interrogate. We are not just providing a support to the research process, we are underpinning it, we are providing the research with the foundations on which it stands. As we know, all research and ideas are built on things that have gone before. So finding your place is all about recognising, even if you think you don’t do research, as a librarian you probably do. Or as someone who provides specialist advice and support to others on information related issues, then you are in a pretty important place! A house won’t stay up without solid foundations. And good research has to be built on solid information and knowledge.

I think research can sometimes be an exclusive place that makes people feel they are not worthy. Even the language and methodologies, in fact any of the -ologies are horribly scary. That’s not to say anyone can just do research. There are things you need to do properly, like devising a decent research question – and one that can be answered! And finding an appropriate way to collect the data you need. It’s also important not to just go looking for evidence that backs up what you think is true. Having a critical friend with a different perspective to you can be really helpful here. However, for me finding your place is all about finding the topics that you are passionate about, so the research really matters to you. The best research projects I have worked on are ones where I feel like I am making a difference, or helping to develop something that will make a difference, even if just in a small way. And there are lots of different types of research, much of what I do has a really practical application. But that still doesn’t mean I don’t try to read some literature, see what others have done in the field, and develop a robust methodology. One example is the research I’ve been doing with Chris on librarians and copyright – what do they want to learn more about and what aspects of copyright cause them concern? And then let’s try and see what their experience of copyright as a phenomenon might tell us about how to improve things. This research helped us write the recent guidance for librarians on the Copyrightuser.org website. But it should also help us to develop and improve resources like Copyright the Card Game. So, I urge you to start thinking of yourself as a researcher and get out there and try to find your place where you can make a difference!

Conversing about copyright

I was lucky enough to record a podcast with James Clay earlier in the week which is now available from his website. He interviewed me and Chris Morrison as part of a series of podcasts that James records on issues related to e-learning. It wasn’t just a shameless plug for our forthcoming book Copyright and E-learning: a guide for practitioners or Copyright the CaPF_Fortune_Cookie_11062016195137885rd Game, it was great to talk about a range of issues related to copyright and how to approach the issues that using new technologies gives rise to. Some people might think copyright is boring and restrictive, however, have a listen to our podcast and hopefully see that understanding copyright is empowering and there are ways of teaching others about copyright which don’t involve sending people to sleep! It’s also important to think about embedding copyright good practices into the range of training available in your institution and teaching it in a positive way about what people can do. And of course as people who know me know, I do love conversing about copyright, and eating cookies and cake, and talking about Star Wars parodies. It’s all in the podcast and it’s not long until the book is published either! I’ll also be heading to Dublin in just over a week to talk about Copyright and E-learning and play Copyright the Card Game at the DIT E-learning Summer School.

On why there is never enough time

Time by Old Rollei

Time by Old Rollei licensed under CC-BY and available at: https://flic.kr/p/5YW8LF

I’m always finding myself running between meetings, switching between projects and tasks, wearing different hats (metaphorically not really – although I do have two hats I like quite a lot!) and wondering why there are never enough hours in the day. I kid myself I can multi-task, but it’s not true (no one can), if I try doing too many things at once I just do them all far less well. So I find myself working on tasks for short bursts of time and then moving on to something else, before switching to something new. Lisa Jeskins told me about the pomodoro technique and I think without knowing it, this was what I had been doing. Apparently it’s good for mental agility, which must be a good thing.

Last week, talking to a colleague she said ‘you like to be busy, it’s how you get so much done.’ And I was struck by this and decided it was probably true. No sooner do I tick one thing off my Wunderlist app, then I’ve added another, or four more tasks. I guess the key to getting things done (yes I have read the David Allen book) for me is good planning and trying not to let too many deadline collide. But sometimes having a lot to do makes me more efficient, whereas a day with no meetings can drag by and be wasted if I am not careful. Some of the things I’ve been working on this week include:

  • Hosting a placement student from UCL who is spending time in LTI and the Library
  • Finishing my guide to copyright for PhD students with our Repository Manager, Dimity
  • Planning the evaluation for this year’s SADL programme and briefing my new research assistant
  • Planning the next London Digital Student Meet-up with Moira Wright from UCL
  • Planning the first conference for LSE POWER – the women’s professional network with a fantastic bunch of colleague
  • Planning a series of workshops for LSE’s Learning and Development Group on sharing good practice in planning, designing, delivering and evaluating training
  • Finishing a co-authored chapter on copyright literacy to be published next year by Routledge
  • Proof reading Copyright and E-learning, my forthcoming book
  • Writing a piece for the Statistics Department website on why their students inspired me through the SADL programme.

On top of this I’ve got plenty going on with ILG work (we’ve just finished judging this year’s Research and Information Literacy award), I’m preparing for a CLA licence negotiation meeting next week and starting to think about my talk on 10 years of digital literacy at the UCISA digital capabilities event next month. But will I slow down? Never! When there are projects to plan, papers to write, conferences to attend and a world of copyright and digital literacy to enjoy! There never will be enough time, but that is what makes my job such fun! That and working with some  great people who keep me motivated!